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Good news on Ivermectin for treatment of Covid-19

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Press Release 6 January 2021
New British research has examined and pooled data from a wide range of international studies–including Argentina, Bangladesh, Iran, Pakistan, Spain, Egypt, Indiaand the US –and found that the anti-parasitic medicine Ivermectin not only reduces deaths from Covid-19, but can be used to protect doctorsand nurses–as well as others who have had „contacts‟ with ill people–from getting the infection. Thereport was publishedlast week by an independent UK-based medical research company, the Evidence-Based Medicine Consultancy Ltd (E-BMC).The research was conducted to supportthe recent findings of Dr Pierre Koryand clinical experts of the Front Line Covid-19 Critical CareAlliance(FLCCC)in the US.Doctors around the world are now working together to raise awareness of this life-saving medicine which probably reduces the risk of a person dying from Covid-19 by between 65% and 95%. In addition, the researchers believe that ivermectinshould be offered as a prophylactic measure to health care workersas soon as possible because the analysis shows that ivermectin substantially reducesCovid-19 infections in these at risk groups.The conclusions of the new globalresearch are so clear that it is believedIvermectin should be viewed as an essential drug to reduce the severity of illness and fatalities caused by the Covid-19 virus.In most studies included in the review, the doses of Ivermectin given were similar to those given for common parasitic infections in humans (e.g. 0.2mg/kg orally, equivalent to a 12mg tablet for a 60 kg adult).
Commenting on the research, Dr Tess Lawrieof the E-BMC, said,
“This is really good news. Ivermectin will have a significant impact on the battle against COVID-19.

“It also offers great hope for the better protection of our doctors and nurses who are on the front lines of this terrible crisis, as well as the protection of those who have had „contacts‟ with sick people.“Ivermectin is a well-known, safe and inexpensive medicine that is currently unlicensed in the UK for human use.

“This research is the integration of global effortsby clinicians, researchers, and study participants to make a difference in the fight against Covid-19. We owe a debt of thanks to them all.
“I hope that policymakers now respond to this information with the required urgency to save lives and protect our health care workers.”

NOTES TO EDITORS
1.Dr Lawrie has written to Mr Hancock and Mr Ashworth but has not yet had a reply. Today she recorded a video letter in an urgent attempt to reach the Prime minister. This letter has been posted on www.e-bmc.co.uk.
2.The report can also be found on www.e-bmc.co.uk
3.Health care professionals may wish to refer to the clinical guidance on Ivermectin use at the Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance(https://covid19criticalcare.com/).
4.Ivermectin is used in the treatment of various parasitic diseases such as river blindness, round worm, lice and scabies. This safe and inexpensive drug is onthe Essential Medicines list of the World Health Organization (WHO) and is also used by vetenarians to treat parasitic infections in animals. 5.Ivermectin was originally derived from soil bacteria in Japan by Dr Satoshi Omura (Japan) and Dr William Campbell (USA) who were awarded a Nobel prize for its discovery in 2015.
6.TheFLCCC review on which the EBMC rapid review is based can be found at https://covid19criticalcare.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/FLCCC-Ivermectin-in-the-prophylaxis-and-treatment-of-COVID-19.pdf
7.The scientist in charge of the meta-analysis, Dr Tess Lawrie has no commercial interests in the drug Ivermectinand nor does E-BMCLtd.
8.Dr Tess Lawriehas no connection tothe FLCCC expert groupat https://covid19criticalcare.com/
9.Tess Lawrie has shared the data files used in the E-BMCreportwith Dr Andrew Hill of Liverpool University.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yOAh7GtvcOs

 
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